Previous Announcements

Call for Papers:  MAD Magazine and Its Legacies

Special issue of Studies in American Humor, Fall 2014

Since 1952, MAD Magazine has regaled humor lovers and inspired humor producers in many media. Studies in American Humor, the journal of the American Humor Studies Association, invites submission of scholarly papers devoted to MAD Magazine and its legacies for a special issue of the journal appearing in the fall of 2014, coedited by John Bird (Winthrop University) and Judith Yaross Lee (Ohio University).

Topics might include, but are not limited to:

*humor, verbal and/or visual

*subversive humor

*satire (as technique, analysis of individual examples or themes, etc.)

*parody (as technique, analysis of individual examples or themes, etc.)

*individual artists and writers

*regular and occasional features

*one or mode recurrent themes (politics, technology, parenthood, suburbia)

*cultural impact and legacies

*influence, general and specific (including direct influence on individuals and genres)

*reception

Potential contributors should send queries and abstracts (500-750 words) by October 1, 2013 or complete manuscripts by June 1, 2014.  Email queries and abstracts to studiesinamericanhumor@ohio.edu.  General information on Studies in American Humor and submission guidelines are available athttp://studiesinamericanhumor.org/.

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Call for Articles - Oklahoma HUMANITIES Magazine

The Oklahoma Humanities Council is the state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities. This “call for articles” is for the January 2014 issue of our magazine, which will feature the topic of “Humor and the Humanities.” Inclusion is honorary; compensation consists of 5 copies of the issue in which your article appears.You can view the magazine online at:http://www.okhumanities.org/publications [current issue]
http://www.okhumanities.org/archives 

WHAT’S SO FUNNY?

What do you mean, funny? Funny-peculiar or funny ha-ha? — Ian Hay, The Housemaster, Act III

A sense of humor, it has been said, is one of the innate qualities that separate humans from animals. In this issue of our magazine, we’ll explore comedy, what it reveals about who we are, and how we employ it to navigate our world. Remember: ours is a “general” audience—not academic. For this “humor” issue, we’re looking for light-hearted content and witty delivery.

  • Unless listeners have the ability to view a subject matter from multiple perspectives, then they cannot experience humor.—Hugh LaFollette and Niall Shanks
    How is comedy specific to culture, custom, and region—and why is some comedy universal?
  • All I need to make a comedy is a park, a policeman, and a pretty girl.—Charlie Chaplin
    How does comedy play on the humanities disciplines (literature, history, philosophy, ethics)? How has the expression of comedy evolved with civilization (stage, political cartoon, comic strip, stand-up, TV, film)? How is humor holding up across technology and social platforms?
  • Comedy is an imitation of the common errors of our life.—Emmanuel Joseph Sieyès
    How does laughter relate to “community”?
  • A difference of taste in jokes is a great strain on the affections.—George Eliot
    Why is it that we appreciate some jokes, but others we just don’t “get”? What are the issues and events from our history about which we can laugh—and when is laughter strictly taboo?
  • Humor is a valuable tool for examining and coping with diversity and change.—Lawrence E. Mintz
    How does humor undermine or promote attitudes about race, gender, religion, class, and ethnicity?
  • Humor should not be regarded as the sweetening around a sour pill. It is something that clears the air, makes life more real, and therefore less frightening.—Walt Kelley
    Historically, how have we used humor to cope with tragedy and difficulty?
  • If I were two-faced, would I be wearing this one?—Abraham Lincoln
    How is American humor tied to our politics?
  • I certainly know that a comedian can only last till he either takes himself serious or his audience takes him serious, and I don’t want either one of those to happen to me till I am dead (if then).—Will Rogers
    Will Rogers is Oklahoma’s consummate comedian and favorite son—a towering historical figure in American humor. This magazine—indeed most any publication produced in or about our state—has featured Will’s wit and wisdom. But what do we not know? Is there new scholarship on Will Rogers? What did Rogers himself write about humor? Is there a short column or example of his writing that would tickle the fancy of today’s readers? Fair warning: you’ll have to try mighty hard to “win” the Will Rogers space. We’re looking for something that’s un-common knowledge and truly fun to read.

The broad questions above are posed to stimulate ideas, not to limit the scope of proposals. Above all, we seek material based in scholarship that is easily understood by and accessible to “general audience” readers.

About our publication: Print readership is approximately 10,500 statewide [donors, universities, public libraries, cultural organizations, state and national legislators, etc.] with additional distribution via events, bookstores, etc. The publication is distributed free of charge as a part of our public programming.

Previous authors have included: Michael Sandel [What Money Can't Buy]; Mickey Edwards [The Parties Versus The People]; Krista Tippet [host of NPR’s “On Being”]; Mark Slouka [Harper’s Magazine]; and Kim Stafford [100 Tricks Every Boy Can Do].

Click here for Author Guidelines on the style and tone of articles we publish. We’re looking for a feature article length of about 2000 words. Please send the following:

  • Short synopsis of your proposed article
  • Brief resume of your experience
  • Sample of your writing that reflects the tone and style of our magazine

Please respond by June 17th. If we accept your proposal, the deadline for your text will be September 1st.

Feel free to contact me if you have questions. Thanks for your consideration and I look forward to hearing from you.

Contact:

Carla D. Walker – Editor, Oklahoma HUMANITIES Magazine
Director of Publications
Oklahoma Humanities Council
428 W. California Avenue, Ste. 270
Oklahoma City, OK 73102
405/235-0280 * Fax 405/235-0289
carla@okhumanities.org

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The Kurt Vonnegut Memorial Library is now accepting submissions for our second annual edition of “So It Goes: The Literary Journal of the Kurt Vonnegut Memorial Library.” This is an exciting opportunity for creative Kurt Vonnegut readers everywhere to help us continue our annual literary tradition.

War and Peace was the theme of our inaugural issue of “So It Goes,” and we were delighted to release the journal during “Veterans Reclaim Armistice Day: Healing through the Humanities,” our 11/11/12 event, which also happened to be Kurt Vonnegut’s birthday. Contributors to our first issue included Morley Safer, Tim O’Brien, Dan Wakefield, as well as several other Hoosiers, veterans, students, and Vonnegut lovers across the planet. Our first issue is now available in the library’s online gift shop throughwww.vonnegutlibrary.org and in person at the library in Indianapolis.

Humor is the theme of this year’s edition of “So It Goes.” We want your whimsy, levity, dark satire, political parody, topical tomfoolery, sarcastic spoofs, and wit. Keep in mind that we are looking for your unique voice and not just an imitation of Vonnegut’s trademark, humorous humanism.

Please submit your poetry, creative nonfiction, short fiction, original artwork, and/or photography related to the theme of humor.

We will accept new and previously published work (simultaneous submissions are allowed with notification) and will credit the original publisher for previously published works. If the work in your submission(s) has been published elsewhere (even if it is your own work), you may need permission to publish it in this issue of “So It Goes.” If this is the case, you must obtain the written permission of the rights holder(s) and include this written permission with your submission(s). Please request worldwide rights for print and electronic formats in all languages and editions.

If you are unsure if your usage requires permission, go to https://kvml.submittable.com/submit. You should also go to the submittable site for additional instructions about preparing your submission.

Submissions are limited to one work of prose (maximum 1,500 words) or up to five poems, photographs, and/or works of art. Format with double space, use 12-point Times New Roman font, and include a cover letter with a brief biography.

We accept both electronic and paper submissions.

Submit electronic entries through kvml.submittable.com. Send paper submissions to Vonnegut Library, So It Goes Submissions, 340 N. Senate Ave., Indianapolis, IN 46204. Include a self-addressed stamped envelope with sufficient postage for response.

Submitted materials will not be returned.

Submissions will be accepted through July 15, 2013. If you have any questions, contact us at SoItGoes@vonnegutlibrary.org.

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MMLA Conference [November 7-10, 2013 Milwaukee, Wisconsin] Special Session: “Irony and Authenticity in Contemporary Artistic Production”

Panel Organizer: Janessa Toro, University of Missouri
Contact Email: jltz85@mail.missouri.edu
Submission Deadline: June 14

Is there room for earnestness and authenticity in contemporary media? In accordance with the 2013 Midwest Modern Language Association conference theme of “Art & Artifice”, This panel explores the intersection of authenticity and irony in literature, film, music, and other media. While stable irony depends upon fixed meanings intended to elicit specific interpretations from an audience, contemporary theories of language, identity, and community emphasize the ultimate contingency and instability of meaning. Thus, the possibility for irony is thrown into question; is irony impossible, or is irony all-pervasive? Likewise, is any form of authenticity or earnestness possible in artistic production? What happens when an earnest art form is treated ironically? How can we interpret irony or authenticity as such?

Papers from a variety of fields that explore at least two different media will be particularly useful for this discussion, though single-media topics are also welcome. This panel would greatly benefit from a respondent, as well. The Midwest Modern Language Association Conference will be held this year at the Hilton Milwaukee City Center in Milwaukee, Wisconsin from November 7-10.

Abstract Deadline: June 14. Please send a 250-300 word abstract to panel organizer Janessa Toro

(jltz85@mail.missouri.edu). Conference Program Deadline has been extended: June 28; Conference Registration: July 12.
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The AHSA has issued a call for papers for sessions at the Modern Language Association Convention in Chicago, January 9-12, 2014.  MLA and AHSA membership are required for participation in these sessions.

1) The Tyranny of Irony and Irony’s Edge

300-word abstracts welcome on interpretive practice in the wake of insights from David Foster Wallace, Linda Hutcheon, and others on literary irony. 300-word abstracts. by 4 March 2013; Bruce F. Michelson (brucem@illinois.edu).

2) Wit, Humor, and ‘Serious’ Texts

Abstracts welcome on any subject related to comic dimensions in literary works not normally classified as ‘comic.’. 300 word abstracts by 4 March 2013; Bruce F. Michelson (brucem@illinois.edu).

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Hello! I’m chairing a panel on AMERICAN HUMOR at the upcoming Rocky Mountain Modern Language Association Conference to be held October 10-12, 2013 in Vancouver, Washington (across the Columbia River from Portland, Oregon) and would welcome your ABSTRACTS on any facet of AMERICAN HUMOR. The call for papers can be found at www.rmmla.org, link to Convention, link to 2013 Call for Papers. This is always a great conference, offering 105 continuing sessions and 58 special topic sessions. INTERESTED? Please send your questions or abstracts (due March 1) to Dr. Judy Sneller, SD School of Mines & Technology, Dept. of Humanities,Judy.Sneller@sdsmt.edu or call me at 605-430-5956.****CALL FOR PAPERS/STS
Mark Twain Panel
Ms. Jules A. Hojnowski

Rocky Mountain Modern Language Association Conference

October 10-12, 2013
Vancouver, WASHINGTON<http://www.visitvancouverusa.com/> (across the Columb=
ia River from Portland, Oregon – fly into PDX!) at the Hilton Vancouver Was=
hington<http://www1.hilton.com/en_US/hi/hotel/PDXVAHH-Hilton-Vancouver-Wash=
ington-Washington/index.do
>
Mark Twain
The Western Residences of Mark Twain: Found in Fact or Fiction
This panel is focusing on Mark Twain’s “Residences” out west, converging on=
experiences or relationships while in that residence.  Residences could in=
clude a friend’s home, an apartment, a room in a hotel or even a tent.  Thi=
s could include works written by Mark Twain, or other authors writing about=
him.
This session invites academic papers, multi-media, or digital pieces on any=
aspect of Mark Twain’s “home” while he was in the west.  By March 1, 2013,=
email or regular mail 300-word abstracts with the requisite information as=
noted in the RMMLA call for papers guidelines,  http://rmmla.wsu.edu/confe=
rences/presenters.asp

to Mrs. Jules A. Hojnowski, at JAH11@cornell.edu<mailto:JAH11@cornell.edu> =
or 1690 Trumansburg Rd, Ithaca, NY 14850

****

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TEACHING POPULAR CULTURE

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

*The editors of /Transformations/ seek submissions that explore popular
culture from all pedagogical contexts and interdisciplinary
perspectives. We accept *articles* (5,000-10,000 words), *media essays*
(overviews on books, film, video, performance, art, music, websites,
etc. 3,000 to 5,000 words) and* items for an occasional feature, “The
Material Culture of Teaching.” */Note extended deadline: Submissions for
this special issue on Teaching Popular Culture are now due Feb. 15,
2013. /We welcome jargon-free submissions that explore strategies for
teaching about popular culture in the classroom and in non-traditional
spaces (such as the media, museums, and in public discourse).

*/Transformations/ publishes only essays that focus on teaching.*

For submission guidelines, please go to
http://web.njcu.edu/sites/transformations/Content/default.asp
<https://webmail.exchange.njcu.edu/owa/redir.aspx?C=7f7a69afa69a4a3298abff14647e4b3b&URL=http%3a%2f%2fweb.njcu.edu%2fsites%2ftransformations%2fContent%2fdefault.asp>

Send submissions or inquiries in MLA format (7th ed.) as attachments in
MS Word or Rich Text format to: Jacqueline Ellis and Ellen Gruber
Garvey, Editors, transformations@njcu.edu
<https://webmail.exchange.njcu.edu/owa/redir.aspx?C=7f7a69afa69a4a3298abff14647e4b3b&URL=mailto%3atransformations%40njcu.edu>

Author(s) name and contact information
should be included on a SEPARATE page.
For submission guidelines go to
http://web.njcu.edu/sites/transformations/Content/default.asp
<https://webmail.exchange.njcu.edu/owa/redir.aspx?C=7f7a69afa69a4a3298abff14647e4b3b&URL=http%3a%2f%2fwww.njcu.edu%2fassoc%2ftransformations>

Possible topics for articles:

* Defining popular culture
* Popular culture as a pedagogical tool
* Popular culture and technology
* History and popular culture
* Popular culture, memory, and nostalgia
* Media literacy
* Representations of race, class, and gender in popular culture
* Popular culture in K-12 classrooms
* Popular culture and the corporatization of education
* Subculture, handmade culture, independent culture
* Popular culture and sexuality
* Erasures and omissions in popular culture
* Popular culture and “normality”
* Reading popular culture
* Fandom and style
* Controversies in popular culture: pornography, violence
* Popular culture in national, transnational, and global contexts
* Consumption of popular culture, reading and using popular culture

Past issues of /Transformations/ include: Teaching Feelings, Teaching
Digital Media, Teaching Sex, Teaching Earth, Teaching Nation, and
Teaching Performance. We encourage you to familiarize yourself with the
journal before submitting. Please visit our website to order previous
issues.

CALL FOR PAPERS

Mark Twain Panel
Ms. Jules A. Hojnowski
Rocky Mountain Modern Language Association Conference
October 10-12, 2013=20
Vancouver, WASHINGTON (across the Columbia River from Portland, Oregon – fl=
y into PDX!) at the Hilton Vancouver Washington

Mark Twain
The Western Residences of Mark Twain: Found in Fact or Fiction
This panel is focusing on Mark Twain’s “Residences” out west, converging on=
experiences or relationships while in that residence.  Residences could in=
clude a friend’s home, an apartment, a room in a hotel or even a tent.  Thi=
s could include works written by Mark Twain, or other authors writing about=
him.

This session invites academic papers, multi-media, or digital pieces on any=
aspect of Mark Twain’s “home” while he was in the west. =20
By March 1, 2013, email or regular mail 300-word abstracts with the requisi=
te information as noted in the RMMLA call for papers guidelines,  http://rm=
mla.wsu.edu/conferences/presenters.asp

to Mrs. Jules A. Hojnowski, at JAH11@cornell.edu or 1690 Trumansburg Rd, It=
haca, NY 14850

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SAMLA 2013:  Humor in the Digital Age

The American Humor Studies Association seeks papers for a panel, “Humor in the Digital Age,” for the 2013 South Atlantic Modern Language Association (SAMLA) Conference at the Marriott Atlanta from November 8-10. This panel will examine how the rise of new media (including social media, content-sharing sites, and blogs) has created new contexts for the production, distribution, and exhibition of humor. We welcome papers on humor and comedy as it is employed in viral videos, blogs or vlogs, web series, webisodes, parodies, participatory culture online, memes, or remixes. Papers may cover individual talents Andy Borowitz of The Borowitz Report, Grace Helbig of DailyGrace, Jenna Marbles, Khyan Mansley, Maddox, Tucker Max; groups Derrick Comedy and the Gregory Brothers (“Auto-Tune the News”); sites College Humor, Funny or Die, The Onion, and Stuff White People Like; social media Facebook, Tumblr, and Twitter; and other “genres” like mommy blogs, movie trailer recuts, trending hashtags (#firstworldproblems, #drunknatesilver).Prospective panelists could also consider how humorists and comedians/comediennes use websites and social media to connect with their audiences, attract new fans, and disseminate their brand of humor. The overall goal is to examine how digital media technologies either democratize or restrict the creation and distribution of innovative comedy, examining key problems and possibilities posed by new media for the tradition of American humor. Please send inquiries and proposals of 250 words to Pete Kunze atpkunze@lsu.edu by May 1, 2013.

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American Literature Association

2013 National Convention

Boston,  Westin Copley Hotel, May 26-29.

The AHSA plans to sponsor two sessions at the 2013 national meeting. We seek cogent, provocative, well-researched papers on the following subjects:

1. “Humor in Periodicals: From Punch to Mad”—Abstracts (300 words max.) are encouraged on the role of humorous literature in American periodicals from the early national period to the present.  Subject adaptable to both humorous periodicals and humor in serious periodicals across a wide time range; thus, title will change to reflect composition of panel.

2. “Reading Humorous Texts”–Abstracts (300 words max.) are encouraged on the interpretation, recovery, or pedagogy of humorous texts from novels and poems to plays and stand-up.  Some focus on the act of interpretation of humor in its historical, performative, formal, or other cultural context is encouraged.

Please e-mail abstracts no later than January 15, 2013 to Tracy Wuster (wustert@gmail.com) with the subject line: “AHSA session, 2013 ALA.” Notifications will go out no later than January 20, 2013.

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Call for Papers by The Mark Twain Circle of America
American Literature Association
Boston, May 23-26, 2013
The Mark Twain Circle of America invites proposals for individual papers (15-20 minutes) for sessions it will sponsor at the 2013 ALA conference in Boston, May 23-26, 2013.1.“ Mark Twain and History.”  This topic may be broadly considered including, but not limited to, Mark Twain’s writings about historical events, his writing set in earlier historical periods, his place in history, or his works in relation to other historical figures.2.   Open topic:  The topics are entirely open, provided they are Twain related.Send your proposal (1-2 page abstract) to Linda Morris no later than January 15, 2013:  lamorris@ucdavis.edu

We are just a year away from Elmira 2013: The Seventh International
Conference on the State of Mark Twain Studies.  The Call for Papers has
been posted on the web.  Google Elmira 2013 Call for Papers for
information about submitting a Developed Abstract of 700 words — due
Monday, February 4th, 2013.  Final papers must be suitable for a
20-minute presentation.  Please send your attached abstract, via
electronic submission, to bsnedecor@elmira.edu.  Provide your name,
mailing address, and email address.  Developed abstracts will be
reviewed anonymously for acceptance by selected panel chairs.

We look forward to greeting you in Elmira on August 1 through 4, 2013.

 *****

 Title: Humor & Horror/SF/Fantasy
Location: Missouri
Date: 2013-04-30
Description: Dear Humor & Horror/SF/Fantasy Scholars, this is your
invitation to SUBMIT to the Midwest Popular Culture
Association/American Culture Association annual meetings in St.
Louis, MO, from Friday through Sunday, October 11-13, 2013.
Going too far in these genre may actually just be considered a
good st …
Contact: jdowell@msu.edu
URL: submissions.mpcaaca.org
Announcement ID: 202555
http://www.h-net.org/announce/**show.cgi?ID=202555<http://www.h-net.org/announce/show.cgi?ID=202555>

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Abject Comedy

at MLA

Division: Film
Exploring abjection in screen comedy. Are comedies of embarrassment, excess, or awkwardness a new development toward the abject, or a continuation of comedy’s traditional relationship to the body? 300-word abstract by 15 March 2013; Nicholas Sammond (nic.sammond@utoronto.ca) and Paul Young (paul.d.young@vanderbilt.edu).

http://www.mla.org/cfp_detail_6157

  The 2012 ISHS Conference was held from June 25-29, 2012 at Jagiellonian University in Poland.  We hope you were able to attend.

           The 2013 ISHS Conference is scheduled for July 2-6, 2013 at William and Mary University in Virginia.  You can register for the conference at the following link: http://www.cvent.com/events/25th-international-society-for-humor-studies-conference-2013/event-summary-e7aefa94dc5b4a4b9acd4eb8c0aaf548.aspx . 

Contact Larry Ventis: wlveng@wm.edu .

The 2014 ISHS Conference is scheduled for July 7-11, 2014 in Utrecht, Netherlands.  Contact Sibe Doosje: S.Doosje@fss.uu.nl .

            In the following web site you will find PowerPoints related to “Linguistic Humor and Language Play,” and also PowerPoints related to “Linguistic Humor Across the Disciplines”: http://www.public.asu.edu/~dnilsen .

If you are a member of ISHS, you can obtain information about past and future ISHS conferences in Martin Lampert’s ISHS web site:www.humorstudies.org .

*****

The Mark Twain Circle has the following calls for papers for MLA 2014
(Chicago, January 2014):
1. Mark Twain’s Style(s)–Analysis of Twain’s style, in either fiction or
nonfiction. Preference will be given to papers that break new ground or
challenge old assumptions.
2. Beyond Huck and Puddn’head: Mark Twain and Race–Examinations of Mark
Twain and racial issues in works other than the two most commonly analyzed
texts, Huckleberry Finn and Puddn’head Wilson.

Send 300-word abstracts to me at the address below by March 15, 2013.
Presenters must be members of both MLA and the Mark Twain Circle (can join
after paper is accepted.) Further details will be posted soon to the
circle’s new website: http://marktwaincircle.org/

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Elmira2013CallforPapers

click on link for call for the

Seventh International Conference on the State of Mark Twain Studies

One Man, Many Legacies

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American Literature Association

2013 National Convention

Boston,  Westin Copley Hotel, May 26-29.

The AHSA plans to sponsor two sessions at the 2013 national meeting. We seek cogent, provocative, well-researched papers on the following subjects:

1. “Humor in Periodicals: From Punch to Mad”—Abstracts (300 words max.) are encouraged on the role of humorous literature in American periodicals from the early national period to the present.  Subject adaptable to both humorous periodicals and humor in serious periodicals across a wide time range; thus, title will change to reflect composition of panel.

2. “Reading Humorous Texts”–Abstracts (300 words max.) are encouraged on the interpretation, recovery, or pedagogy of humorous texts from novels and poems to plays and stand-up.  Some focus on the act of interpretation of humor in its historical, performative, formal, or other cultural context is encouraged.

Please e-mail abstracts no later than January 15, 2013 to Tracy Wuster (wustert@gmail.com) with the subject line: “AHSA session, 2013 ALA.” Notifications will go out no later than January 20, 2013.

*****

The Humor Studies Caucus of the American Studies Association is seeking papers for the 2012 ASA Conference:

American Studies Association Annual Meeting: 

“Beyond the Logic of Debt, Toward an Ethics of Collective Dissent,” 

November 21-24, 2013: Hilton Washington, DC

http://www.theasa.net/annual_meeting/page/submit_a_proposal/

Proposals on any aspect of American Humor will be welcome, including, but not limited to:

Stand-Up Comedy      Jokes     Wit           Merriment

Literary Humor  (both high- and low-brow)       Richard Pryor

Film     Satire     Will Rogers

Comedy Jokes     Risibility     Sitcoms

Laughter

Mark Twain     Dirty Jokes    Lenny Bruce

Ventriloquism     the Circus     Marietta Holley

subtle humor     broad humor

Margaret Cho     regional humor

transnational humor     ethnic humor

and even puns…

Proposals due by: January 11th

Panels will be assembled for submission by the January 26 deadline.

Proposals should be no more than 500 words and should include a brief CV (1 page).  Please include current ASA membership status.

Proposals (and questions) should be sent to Tracy Wuster and Jennifer Hughes: wustert@gmail.com & jahughes@yhc.edu

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3rd North East Texas Humor Research Conference (NETHRC) 2013
Humor in the Professions, Psychology, Pedagogy: Intercultural perspectives
http://www.tamuc.edu/humor

February 22-24, 2013 | Southern Methodist University, Dallas, Texas

Hosted by:
The Division of Communication Studies
SMU Meadows Schools of the Arts

The College of Humanities, Social Sciences & Arts
Texas A&M-Commerce

The 3rd North East Texas Humor Research Conference 2013 invites submissions for a multidisciplinary 3-day conference in Dallas, TX. The conference theme is “Humor in the Professions, Psychology, Pedagogy: Intercultural Perspectives.” While submissions on the theme are strongly encouraged, all submission in humor research are welcome. NETHRC 2013 will include an opening plenary roundtable and reception, paper sessions, panels, posters, and workshops.

Please submit:
* Abstract for general submission (up to 250 words; plus 1 extra page for images, references, etc.); indicate if paper (20m + Q/A) or poster or either.
* Panels of 3 papers (90 minutes)
* Workshops (90 minutes)
* Submission email: CHSSA@tamuc.edu

Important Dates:
* January 4, 2013:  Submission deadline
* January 11, 2013: Notification of acceptance
* January 22, 2013: Preregistration deadline
* February 8, 2013: Deadline for special hotel rate

Conference Organizers:
Christian F. Hempelmann, Ph. D.
Department of Literature & Languages
Texas A&M-Commerce
Hall of Languages
Commerce, TX 75429
c.hempelmann@tamuc.edu

Owen Hanley Lynch, Ph. D.
Communication Studies
Meadows School of the Arts
Southern Methodist University
Umphrey Lee Building
Dallas, TX 75275
olynch@mail.smu.edu

Program Committee:
* Salvatore Attardo, Texas A&M-Commerce
* Sean Guillory, Dartmouth
* Christian F. Hempelmann, Texas A&M-Commerce
* Owen Hanley Lynch, SMU
* Lucy Pickering, Texas A&M-Commerce
* Jyotsna Vaid, Texas A&M-College Station

Conference Fee:
* $40 preregistration by January 22, 2013 ($50 on site)
* $20 for students (please provide proof of student status)
* Submission email: CHSSA@tamuc.edu
* Conference fee includes conference refreshments, Friday night reception, Saturday lunch, and Saturday dinner for students.
* Address for preregistration checks:
NETHRC 2013
College of Humanities, Social Sciences & Arts
P.O. Box 3011
Texas A&M University-Commerce
Commerce, TX 75429-3011

Accommodation:
* Holiday Inn Dallas Central – Park Cities
* 6070 North Expressway, Dallas, TX 75206
(214) 750-6060
* $95/night if booked by February 8, 2013
* Group reservation code: Humor Conference
* Booking link: http://ichotelsgroup.com/redirect?path=rates&brandCode=HI&GPC=HUM&hotelCode=DFWHI&_PMID=99801505
* 0.8 mi from campus
* Hotel offers breakfast and a shuttle to the SMU campus.
* If you’re a student interested in sharing a room, please email: CHSSA@tamuc.edu.
* Closer and more expensive rooms are available at the Lumen: http://www.hotellumen.com/

Conference Venue:
Umphrey Lee Center, 3300 Dyer Street, SMU campus

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Studies in American Humor is now considering essays for our spring 2013 issue.  Deadline for submission November 30, 2012.  Since this will be an open issue, submissions may be on an topic pertinent to American literary humor or the humor of American popular culture.

Our Fall Issue is a special issue dedicated to Kurt Vonnegut.

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Call for Papers: Reimagining the American Dream

University of Texas at Austin American Studies Graduate ConferenceKeynote Address: Thursday, April 4, 2013
Panel discussions: Friday, April 5, 2013Keynote Speaker: Claire Jean Kim, Associate Professor, Political Science and Asian American Studies at the University of California – Irvine.The graduate students of the American Studies Department at the University of Texas at Austin invite submissions for our 2013 Graduate Conference. We encourage submissions that relate to our theme, “Reimagining the American Dream.”In the early 20th century, historian James Truslow Adams wrote that the American Dream was “that dream of a land in which life should be better and richer and fuller,” and yet time and again this promise of opportunity has fallen short: opportunity and prosperity are not demonstrably available to all, and yet this promise, this dream, continues to circulate in the personal and political imagination. After Adams’ early statements on the dream, there emerged a particular vision of dream-status in American postwar prosperity that was countered by global revolutionary and post-colonial movements. Yet the dream bore on into the cocaine-fueled 80s, only to be brought into question once more by a succession of bursting economic bubbles.Given its historical weight, we hope to interrogate and reimagine the American Dream through a series of conversations. To what extent is the American Dream a myth rather than a real possibility? Who has access to its promises? What are the limits of prosperity? How have people leveraged the dream myth? What does the “American Dream” even mean in the 21st century, as the country is in the midst of vast demographic and technological changes? If we have an American dream, what is the American nightmare, and how might American dreams and nightmares coexist or be mutually constitutive?We welcome both individual paper submissions and panel submissions on a wide range of topics related to the conference theme, including but not limited to the following:
§  Dreams and archetypes in American literature
§  Technological determinism and utopianism
§  The religious imagination and the future of the nation/world
§  American dystopias
§  Socioeonomic mobility and education
§  Historical and contemporary explorations of immigration to America
§  Psychoanalysis and the subconscious
§  Spaces real and imagined—historically, nostalgically, culturally, fictitiously or materially constructed
§  The DREAM Act
§  Dream Teams
§  Literary, filmic, artistic, or other representations of ideas pertaining to the American Dream
§  The position of “The American Dream” trope in political campaigns
§  Consumerism and advertising
Deadline: December 1, 2012To submit your abstract, fill out the form at http://utams2013.wordpress.com/cfp.In case of technical difficulties, please email your name, departmental affiliation, paper title, and abstract (250 words maximum) to utams13@gmail.com.
******
Job Description
Job Title:
Writer/Editor 3 #14479
Job ID:
14479
Location: Main Campus-Berkeley
Full/Part Time:
Full-Time
Application Review Date
The First Review Date for this job is: September 1, 2012
Departmental Overview
Located in the midst of the Mark Twain Papers in The Bancroft Library, the Mark Twain Project is editing and publishing a comprehensive scholarly edition of Mark Twain’s writings, including all of his letters, notebooks, and unpublished manuscripts, as well as his well-known literary works. Since 2007 we have been building an electronic edition of these writings, http://www.marktwainproject.org, which draws upon the Web’s strengths of search, organization, and display.
Responsibilities
Researches, writes, and edits material as well as potentially develops digital tools for both print and Web publication, including critical editions, XML documents, and databases. In general, works with colleagues to ensure accuracy and completeness of individual scholarly volumes of Mark Twain’s letters, literary manuscripts, and published works, which are issued by the Mark Twain Project as printed books as well as electronically through its website, Mark Twain Project Online.
Required Qualifications
The ideal candidate has contributed successfully to digital humanities projects and is self-motivated to produce accurate work in collaboration with colleagues. Because of the nature of MTP’s concerns, the candidate must have a deep understanding of textual criticism, including methodologies for establishing texts.
• Thorough knowledge of computer applications for publishing, image handling, and/or web production, especially XML-based workflows.
• Thorough interpersonal communications skills, including active listening and effective collaboration skills.
• Thorough analytical and critical thinking skills.
• Thorough research and fact verification skills.
•  A master’s degree in a related area (e.g. American literature, history) or equivalent research experience and training.
Preferred Qualifications
• Familiarity with TEI-XML, XSL, JavaScript, databases, and/or content management systems (e.g. Drupal).
• Familiarity with library metadata.
• Experience with transcribing manuscripts.
• Experience with devising and running unit and system tests.
• A keen eye for proofreading and copy-editing.
• Ph.D. is preferred.
Salary & Benefits
Monthly: $4,250 – $6,308.33 Annual: $51,000 – $75,700For information on the comprehensive benefits package offered by the University visit:

http://atyourservice.ucop.edu/forms_pubs/misc/benefits_of_belonging.pdf

How to Apply
Please submit your cover letter and resume as a single attachment when applying.
Equal Employment Opportunity
The University of California, Berkeley is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer.
************Title: CALL FOR PAPERS on the topic Religion and the Politics of
Humor
Date: 2012-07-01
Description: CALL FOR PAPERS on the topic Religion and the
Politics of Humor The Bulletin for the Study of Religion is
accepting submissions for a special issue on humor and
religion. Articles engaging any aspect of the theme are
welcome, especially the politics of parody, but including in
general studies of rel …
Contact: philip.tite@mail.mcgill.ca
URL: www.equinoxpub.com/bulletin/
Announcement ID: 187896
http://www.h-net.org/announce/show.cgi?ID=187896

***

Call for Papers, Hawthorne’s Humor 

A special issue of the Nathaniel Hawthorne Review is being planned on Hawthorne’s humor, to be published in fall, 2013. Essays (no longer than 9,000 words, WORD doc files) are invited for consideration on the following topics, although the list is not meant to be exhaustive:

1) Hawthorne’s humor compared to that of other nineteenth-century writers (e.g., Irving, Poe, Fanny Fern, Twain)
2) Hawthorne’s self-deprecating humor, especially of his work (in his introductions to his fiction; his notebooks; his letters)
3) Humor in his children’s stories; humorous depictions of his own children.
4) Hawthorne’s dark, macabre, or acerbic humor; Hawthorne’s Gothic humor
5) Hawthorne’s comic characters; Hawthorne’s caricatures
6) Hawthorne’s romance theory and comic excursions enacting that theory
7) Hawthorne’s philosophy of life and humor
8) Hawthorne’s injection of humor in his formulation of Puritan history
9) Hawthorne’s sketches and the humor of the everyday
10) Hawthorne’s humorous assessments of European life during his travels abroad
11) Hawthorne’s theory of writing (or his attacks on the marketplace) and humor
12) Hawthorne’s humor and its relationship to psychoanalytic, philosophical, and aesthetic theories of humor
13) Hawthorne’s humor and its relationship to nineteenth-century gender roles
14) Parodies and uses of Hawthorne and his works in comic strips, cartoons, and graphic narratives and how they reflect on his reputation as a great American author

Deadline for submission of completed papers is Nov. 15, 2012. Deadline for final revised submissions (of accepted essays) is April 30, 2013. Queries are welcome. Send essays to the guest editor, Prof. M. Thomas Inge at tinge@rmc.edu and to Prof. Monika Elbert, Editor of the Nathaniel Hawthorne Review, atelbertm@mail.montclair.edu

***

Call for Papers
AHSA at MLA 2013

Boston, 3-6 January 2013

“Laughing to Keep from Crying” 

The American Humor Studies Association invites papers addressing the complex relationships between pain and humor. Theoretical submissions are encouraged so long as they are thoroughly grounded in primary texts or performances. Some possible questions to explore: How does humor function in regard to the painful topic? Does finding humor in a painful situation confer any sort of responsibility on the part of the humorist? Is it possible to go too far, and how do we draw those lines? Does laughter generated in this way make us part of a community of shared experience or mark our distance from it? Is it an act of hopelessness or aggression or a defense mechanism against these? Do we, as a Robert Heinlein character once asserted, “laugh . . . because it’s the only thing that will make it stop hurting?” Or is this a naïve perspective? Does explaining the joke, or delineating the pain behind it, spoil the joke or make it more powerful? Are there productive ways to avoid binaries when thinking about pain and humor?

250-500 word abstract by 15 March 2012
Sharon D. McCoy
sdmccoy@uga.edu
sdmccoy@bellsouth.net

Teaching the Humor of Race: (CFP–ASA)

Sponsored by the Humor Studies Caucus, this roundtable will explore the practices, possibilities, and pitfalls of the pedagogy of race and humor.  Most, if not all, American humor contains some element of racial meaning—from the central question of black laughter in representations of both ante- and post-bellum America to the complicated intersections of racial categories in 21st century stand-up.  Teaching about race through humor, and teaching the racial dimensions of humor, presents unique benefits and challenges.

For this roundtable, participants will present (in 8-10 minutes) a theoretical quandary, insight, question, or inquiry into the connection between humor and race in the classroom.  Each presentation should be grounded in one main text—a novel, a stand-up performance, a movie or television show, a joke, a cartoon, etc.  We are especially interested in pieces that connect the study of humor and race to other categories of analysis, such as gender, region, sexuality, religion, class, and especially (given the conference theme) nation, empire, and transnationalism.

If you are interested, please contact Tracy Wuster at wustert@gmail.com as soon as possible, but by January 13 at the latest.  Provide a general idea of your subject and your current ASA membership status.

***

Postmodern Structures of Humor in America (CFP–ASA)

The Humor Studies Caucus is assembling a panel that explores the postmodern turn in comedy and humor. While scholars have considered at length the postmodern content of literature, art, history, drama, and other cultural areas, there is a space for considering how postmodernism has manifested in humor in our contemporary moment. As we can see from television shows like 30 Rock and Community, self-referential, intertextual, absurd narratives are increasingly common in television and film. This panel will not only explore how postmodernism has manifested in comedy, but also what this development suggests about American cultural and political life.

Potential topics include self-referential comedy shows, the “mockumentary” medium, the politics of televisual satire, shifting forms of media consumption evidenced by cable-cutting, the cultural role of the stand-up comedian, the blending of comedy and news, do-it-yourself web series and podcasts, transnational comparative studies of postmodern humor, absurdist fiction and theater. Ideally, the conversation will address humor as expressed in a variety of forms and through a variety of media.

Please send proposals and inquiries to Carrie Andersen at candersen@utexas.edu by January 8, 2011.  Please also include current ASA membership status.

***

CALL FOR PAPERS

American Literature Association
23rd Annual Conference
May 24-27, 2012
San Francisco, CA

American Humor Studies Association

The AHSA hopes to sponsor two sessions at the 2012 national meeting. We seek cogent, provocative, well-researched papers on the following subjects:

1. “Humor, comedy, wit: what can these words mean now?” Abstracts (300 words max.) are encouraged which seek to refresh and clarify fundamental terminology in humor studies, or to shed light on the recent history of those terms.

2. “Humor as American Cultural Practice.” Abstracts (300 words max.) are encouraged on how the history of comic discourses can and should figure into broader constructions of literary, political, and cultural history.

Please e-mail abstracts no later than January 15, 2012 to Bruce Michelson (brucem@illinois.edu<mailto:brucem@illinois.edu> ) with the subject line: “AHSA session, 2012 ALA.” Notifications will go out no later than January 20, 2012.

***********************************************

The Humor Studies Caucus of the American Studies Association is seeking papers for the 2012 ASA Conference:

“Dimensions of Empire and Resistance:

Past, Present, and Future”

November 15-18, 2012: Puerto Rico Convention Center, San Juan, Puerto Rico

http://www.theasa.net/annual_meeting/page/submitting_a_proposal/

Proposals on any aspect of American Humor will be welcome, including, but not limited to:

Stand-Up Comedy

Jokes

Wit

Merriment

Literary Humor

(both high- and low-brow)

Richard Pryor

Film

Satire

Will Rogers

Comedy Jokes

Risibility

Sitcoms

Laughter

Mark Twain

Dirty Jokes

Lenny Bruce

Ventriloquism

the Circus

Marietta Holley

subtle humor

broad humor

Margaret Cho

regional humor

transnational humor

ethnic humor

and even puns…

Proposals due by: January 13th

Panels will be assembled for submission by the January 26 deadline.

Proposals should be no more than 500 words and should include a brief CV.  Please include current ASA membership status.

Proposals should be sent to Tracy Wuster: wustert@gmail.com

***

Call for Papers

Mark Twain Circle Sessions

American Literature Association Conference

San Francisco, CA

May 24-27, 2012

The Mark Twain Circle of America invites proposals forconference sessions (80 minutes per session) or individual papers (15-20 minutes) for the 2012 ALA conference (San Francisco; May 24-27).  The topics are entirely open, provided that they’re Twain-related.  Send your proposal (abstract, 1-2 pages) to Jim Leonard by January 7, 2012, at the following address: jim.leonard@citadel.edu.

***

Call for Papers

Special Joint Session: Henry James and Mark Twain

American Literature Association Conference

San Francisco, CA

May 24-27, 2012

The Mark Twain Circle and the Henry James Society invite proposals for a conference session tentatively titled “Getting Real: Henry James and Mark Twain,” at the 2012 ALA conference (San Francisco; May24-27).  Papers may focus on James-as-Realist, Twain-as-Realist, or both James and Twain; or they may address American Realism in general.  Send your abstract (1-2 pages) to Jim Leonard by January 7, 2012, at the following address:  jim.leonard@citadel.edu.  John Carlos Rowe (johnrowe@usc.edu), 2012 President of the Henry James Society, will serve as contact person for the session on the Henry James side.

***

CFP: Mad Magazine at ALA 2012

I am organizing a special panel on Mad Magazine for the American Literature Association conference in San Francisco, May 24-27, 2012. I  have two papers lined up, and can accept one or two more. So far, we have papers on the music of Mad and on Dave Berg’s satire. I am seeking proposals on any topic related to Mad Magazine, its humor, its cultural and historical importance, etc. Please send a proposal, a title, and your affiliation to me:

birdj@winthrop.edu

I am asking for a firm commitment to attend ALA, if our special session is selected.

***

 ASA 2012!

The Humor Studies Caucus of the American Studies Association is gauging people’s interest in working on panels for ASA next year–November 15-18–in San Juan, Puerto Rico. CFP is pasted below.

In the past, we have sought individuals who wanted to propose individual panel topics, which allows/requires you to write a short CFP, choose papers, find a chair, write the abstract, and submit. In order to submit, you must be a current member of the ASA.

Once we have any individual panel ideas, we will send out both the specific CFPs and a general call.

Please let us know as soon as possible if you would like to propose a panel idea. Please contact Tracy Wuster at wustert@gmail.com

—–
Dimensions of Empire and Resistance: Past, Present, and Future

The Caribe Hilton Hotel, San Juan, Puerto Rico. The site of the 2012 conference calls on us to continue thinking deeply about the conceptual and methodological demands of a truly transnational American Studies. From Christopher Columbus’s second voyage in the late fifteenth century to the irony of an African American president’s state visit to Puerto Rico in the early twenty-first, the long history of this island and its peoples evokes many crucial themes regarding the transnational traffics generated by imperialism and anti-imperialism: indigeneity, conquest, and resistance; the administrative and juridical structures of empire; slavery and emancipation; migrations and diasporas; the mutually constitutive relationship between gender and sexuality on the one hand and imperial practice, subjugation, resistance, or citizenship on the other; the politics of inclusion and exclusion; militarism; local, national, and transnational feminisms; the footprints of corporate capitalism, from extraction to tourism; globalization and neoliberalism; the circuits of slavery and escape, political exile, and cultural production that link Puerto Rico with the larger Caribbean and the Americas; the travel and syncretism of circum-Atlantic arts and musics; the aesthetic traditions of a transnational imaginary; drug traffic; environmental degradation; appalling inequities and the endurance of genius and spirit. Equally important for a transnational American Studies is Puerto Rico’s unique relationship to the United States. From the perverse imperial logic of the Insular Cases, whereby the Supreme Court could define Puerto Rico as “foreign in a domestic sense” — that is, somehow “in” the United States but not “of” it — to Sonia Sotomayor’s ascendance to that very bench (amid dissenting characterizations of her as perhaps more “foreign” than “domestic”) a century later, the history of Puerto Rico and Puerto Ricans sheds a very particular light on the ongoing contradictions of the United States: the limits of U.S. citizenship, the displacements stimulated by neoliberal capitalism, the culture and politics of migration and diaspora. Finally, the simultaneously local and transnational specificities of Puerto Rican history and culture — from the Taíno revival movement to the Young Lords and the Nuyorican Poets Café, from bomba and plena to Salsa and Reggaeton, from the island’s rich journalistic tradition to the alternative political movements of squatters, students, and anti-military activists — remind us that a transnational American studies must also be a truly interdisciplinary inquiry into how the material and symbolic are imbricated, how “culture” encompasses the imaginary and the everyday, how big political events and ideologies, are lived in intensely translocal ways.

Dimensions of Empire and Resistance. Since the publication of Donald Pease and Amy Kaplan’s Cultures of United States Imperialism in 1994, empire has come to hold a central place in American Studies scholarship, resulting in a rich and varied literature devoted to the topic in direct, unblinking, and sophisticated ways. The current call goes out to the many scholars working on US empire and its “others,” to be sure, whether focusing on Manifest Destiny, the Philippines, Vietnam, or the Middle East, for instance. But by the word dimensions we also seek to broaden the conversation significantly, to set the Hilton Hotel alongside the Baghdad Green Zone, so to say — to consider the vast spectrum of political and cultural practices running from colonial administration and military occupation; to tourism; to the history of sugar or rum or baseball; to the power dynamics either fostered or legitimated by educational practices and institutions — in places like Puerto Rico, for instance — or by “knowledge” and the disciplines themselves; to the quotidian imperialist slanders carried in US popular culture — and equally, the constant articulations of dissent; to metaphorical usages, like “media empire,” which are nonetheless embedded in histories of empire proper; to the transnational logic of a canonical “national treasure” like Moby-Dick; to the thick traces of the imperial past and the anti-imperialist present in a text like Empire of Dreams, by Puerto Rican poet Giannina Braschi.

Past, Present, and Future. Although “past” in this context is likely to concentrate the mind on the “splendid little war” of 1898 or on the cartography of US interventionism across ensuing generations, here we also mean to invoke the deep past and its most enduring trajectories, beginning with “encounter” and with conquests now many centuries distant. If European exploration and conquest continue to cast a long shadow across the lands currently under the purview of American Studies, so was the struggle among contending empires a crucible for the political culture of what eventually became the United States. It is one of the great intellectual losses to American Studies in recent years that so many specialists in the colonial and early national periods have withdrawn, as the field itself has gravitated toward the more recent past and the present. The ASA ought to be a natural locus for the rich conversation among specialists in many periods and many social science and humanities disciplines around conceptions like the “extended Caribbean,” or reckoning the stakes of “the global South” for the study of the United States. We seek to re-engage the insight and energy of early Americanists across the disciplines. A high value will be placed on papers and sessions that touch upon aspects of pre-1865 history and culture, panels that span different periods in thematic or comparative perspective, and panels that challenge standard categories of periodization — colonial, early national, antebellum — in the light of a truly transnational perspective.

In recent years, “empire” has become an increasingly complicated word in the US political lexicon — openly and quite positively embraced in some quarters in the early years of the Iraq War, and now increasingly discussed — also openly, even amid ongoing wars in Iraq, Afghanistan, and Libya — as something that is quite evidently at its end, as in “the fall of the American empire” or “the end of the American Century.” Even Time magazine recently announced on its cover, “Yes, America Is in Decline.” Both meanings seem to be integrally embedded within and conveyed by a text like The Wire, for instance, and there is much to explore here from an interdisciplinary perspective. By “present and future,” then, we mean to provoke discussion of these complexities as they affect the peoples both within and without the United States. The behaviors of neoliberal states are crucial here — the shift, as Phillip Bobbitt puts it, from the “nation-state” to the “market-state” — as are the ways in which the corporation has displaced the state as the most significant aggregation of power in many hemispheric or regional contests and has displaced the citizen in many local ones. These developments, though traceable to the longer trajectories of “empire,” have begun to unite the working people of Michigan and Wisconsin with the working people of San Juan in new and unforeseen ways. The Caribbean vantage point of the 2012 conference is also a compelling invitation to rethink or reinterpret the United States’ geopolitical strategies and discourses, both historically and in the future, and to reckon with artistic and literary work that has been devoted to reimagining the boundaries of utopianism and futurity.

***
The Kurt Vonnegut Society (www.vonnegutsociety.net) invites proposals for papers to be presented at the 2012 American Literature Association in San Francisco, May 24-27.  Presenters need not be members of the Kurt Vonnegut Society (but we certainly hope they will join).  Please send a 150-word abstract for 15-minute presentations, along with a brief CV, to Robert Tally atrobert.tally@txstate.edu by January 10, 2012.

The topic is open, and we welcome papers on any aspect of Kurt Vonnegut’s life, work, and legacy.  Presenters may focus on a particular text or cover a range of Vonnegut’s writings.  We are always  interested in papers that look at ways of teaching Vonnegut, and we encourage participation from graduate students, independent scholars, emerging critics, and interdisciplinary researchers.  Of course, we also welcome contributions from experienced Vonnegut scholars and literary critics.  Please address queries to Robert Tally at robert.tally@txstate.edu.

In addition to this open topic panel, the Kurt Vonnegut Society will host a roundtable on Charles Shields’s new biography, And So It Goes: Kurt Vonnegut, A Life.  The roundtable will feature Charles Shields himself, along with a number of current Vonnegut scholars to be announced later.

Also, whether you plan to participate in or attend either the panel or the roundtable, please join members of the Society at our annual “Timequake Clambake,” a pay-as-you-go dinner-and-drink event (details to be determined).

***
Ted Gournelos, editor of the essay collection, A Decade of Dark Humor, is looking for people 
to review the book for a number of possible publications.  If you are interested, please 
contact Ted at: tgournelos@rollins.edu   The book looks excellent.

http://www.upress.state.ms.us/books/1391

***

ASA!

One time only….

Such an assembly of scholarship is only seen

ONCE PER YEAR!

Featuring:

Panels on HUMOR

Sponsored by

The Humor Studies Caucus

HUMOR AS REPARATION AND REPRESENTATION

Schedule Information:
Scheduled Time: Sat, Oct 22

10:00am – 11:45am

Building/Room: Hilton
Baltimore, Key Ballroom 09

Session Participants:
Chair: Leah Dilworth (Long Island University, Brooklyn (NY))

Against All Odds: Imagination, Transformation, and Humor after the
Dred Scott Decision
Ellen J. Goldner (City University of New York, College of Staten
Island (NY))

Stop Addressing Us as ‘Sir’: Women, Imagination, and the Humor of the
World Wars
Scott Hamilton Suter (Bridgewater College (VA))

Supreme Laughter: The Reparative Function of Laughter in the American
Courtroom
Fran McDonald (Duke University (NC))

Comment: Thomas Ferraro (Duke University (NC))

*****
ETHNIC HUMOR: PLEASURES AND PROBLEMS

Scheduled Time: Sun, Oct 23

10:00am – 11:45am

Building/Room: Hilton
Baltimore / Key Ballroom 10

Participants:
Chair: Holger Kersten (Otto-von-Guericke University of Magdeburg,
Germany)

Claiming an Asian American Comedic Tradition: The Case of Harold &
Kumar Go to White Castle
Caroline Kyungah Hong (City University of New York, Queens College
(NY))

Listening to Change: Radio, Humor, and the Future of Cuban Miami
Albert Sergio Laguna (Columbia College (IL))

Beyond a Cutout World: Ethnic Humor and Discursive Integration in
South Park
Nick Marx (University of Wisconsin, Madison (WI)), Matt Sienkiewicz
(University of Wisconsin, Madison (WI))

Comment: Holger Kersten (Otto-von-Guericke University of Magdeburg,
Germany)

*************************************
CALL FOR PAPERS
Modern Language Association Annual Convention
Boston, 3-6 January 2013

“Laughing to Keep from Crying”

The American Humor Studies Association invites papers addressing the complex relationships between pain and humor.   Theoretical submissions are encouraged so long as they are thoroughly grounded in primary texts or performances.

Some possible questions to explore:  How does humor function in regard to the painful topic?  Does finding humor in a painful situation confer any sort of responsibility on the part of the humorist?  Is it possible to go too far, and how do we draw those lines?  Does laughter generated in this way make us part of a community of shared experience or mark our distance from it?  Is it an act of hopelessness or aggression or a defense mechanism against these?  Do we, as a Robert Heinlein character once asserted, “laugh . . . because it’s the only thing that will make it stop hurting?”  Or is this a naïve perspective?   Does explaining the joke, or delineating the pain behind it, spoil the joke or make it more powerful?  Are there productive ways to avoid binaries when thinking about pain and humor?

250-500 word abstract by 15 March 2012

Sharon D. McCoy
sdmccoy@uga.edu
sdmccoy@bellsouth.net

posted 29 September 2012

************************************

If you’re going to be at the Modern Language Association Meeting this year, please join us at the American Humor Studies Association panel:

MLA 2012, Seattle
January 5-8, 2012

177. “Satire’s Double-Edged Irony: Self-Satire and the Control of the Satirical Object”
Friday, January 6, 8:30–9:45 a.m.
304, Washington State Convention Center

Program arranged by the American Humor Studies Association
Presiding: Sharon D. McCoy, Univ. of Georgia

1. “‘The National Joker’ and the ‘Stealing Back and Forth of  Symbols,’”
Todd Nathan Thompson, Indiana University of Pennsylvania

2. “The Cubies’ ABC and the Modernist Debt to Antimodernist  Satire,”
Eric Rettberg, University of Virginia

3. “Marianne Moore’s Empathetic Satires,”
Rachel V. Trousdale, Agnes Scott College

posted 29 September 2011


*************************************

February at the Red Lion Inn (Stockbridge Mass.)

The Weekend before Valentines Day

The AHSA is considering throwing a “For Publication” mini-conference at the Red Lion Inn. we would invite the Mark Twain Circle also. The Red Lion is the grand-daddy of New England Inns, but with gorgeous up-dated rooms and an outdoor all-year round hot-tub. This is Norman Rockwell and ski country, also.

The conference would be for Thursday Friday Saturday of February (9th-11th). Everyone coming would have a place on the program as chair/responder or presenter and the sole object of the mini-conference would be to help advance publication plans for books and articles by advice from other scholars. Presenters could bring questions, pages, chapters, or anything else and receiveprofessional feedback.

Sessions would be held from 9 to noon to allow for skiing and wintering in the Berkshires. Room rates would be around $159  plus tax for rooms that usually go in the high $200-350 range. Registration $25.

Would people who are interested or willing to commit relatively soon please email Dave Sloane at dsloane@newhaven.edu at once so that we can tell if we have enough positive interest to go to stage 2 planning. Thanks everyone.

Posted 9/20/11

***********************

Title: Vonnegut and Humor: special issue of *Studies in American
Humor* (proposals due Nov. 1, 2011)
Date: 2011-11-01
Description: Vonnegut and Humor: special issue of *Studies in
American Humor* (proposals due Nov. 1, 2011) 2011 may well be
called The Year of Kurt Vonnegut. In April the Library of
America issued a volume including his novels from 1963 to 1973,
effectively canonizing Vonnegut. A school board of Republic,
Missou …
Contact: robert.tally@txstate.edu
Announcement ID: 187889
http://www.h-net.org/announce/show.cgi?ID=187889

Posted 9/20/11

*****************

Posted 9/20/11

***********

CFP: Humour and the Fantastic

Humour has been a recognisable part of literature ever since antiquity. The ‘Homeric laughter’ has become proverbial and Lucian dazzled the readers of his Vera Historia with a firework of comic (and absurd) ideas. Nevertheless, the co-existence or even symbiosis of humorous and fantastic elements is the exception rather than the rule. Lucian’s work points the way for most of the later instances, and we find elements of the fantastic and the humorous co-existing most often in texts that show a self-reflexive genre awareness; in consequence the ‘funny’ fantastic results from parodistic exaggeration of certain traits.

Non-parodistic fantastic literature is, at least in the Western tradition, mostly free of humour. A cursory glance at the ‘canon’ of the fantastic affirms this impression, though we can also note attempts at combining the Gothic with the humorous, as in Oscar Wilde’s The Canterville Ghost(1887), or the absurd (as another category of the humorous) with the fantastic, as in Nicolai Gogol’s The Nose (1835), or the fantastique with the French humour tinged with bitter irony, as in Honoré de Balzac’s L’Élixir de longue vie (1846) or Gérard de Nerval’s Le Monstre vert (1852). It is only at the end of the 20th century that the subcategory of ‘the humorous fantasy’ makes an appearance, most notably in the works of Terry Pratchett and his highly successful parodies of the genre.

Fastitocalon is pleased to solicit proposals for papers for its third volume, which explore the relationship between Humour and the Fantastic. Contributions may focus on individual works or protagonists, discuss the historical development and transformations, or explore the literary-theoretical aspects connected with these aspects. Even though the language of publication is English, we would like to encourage the contributors to include works in other languages in their discussion of the phenomenon.

Deadline for abstracts (issue 1): 30 November 2011

Deadline for full papers (issue 1): 29 February 2012

Deadline for abstracts (issue 2): 31 January 2012

Deadline for full papers (issue 2): 30 June 2012

Fastitocalon is a peer-reviewed journal. Abstracts and/or full papers submitted will be reviewed by the editors and members of the board of advisors.

Abstracts (c. 600 words or 3,000 characters) or full papers (up to c. 8,000 words or 40,000 characters), together with a brief biographical sketch, are to be sent to either of the following addresses:

Prof. Dr. Fanfan Chen

Email: ffchen@mail.ndhu.edu.tw / chenfantasticism@gmail.com

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Call for Papers, Hawthorne’s Humor 

A special issue of the Nathaniel Hawthorne Review is being planned on Hawthorne’s humor, to be published in fall, 2013. Essays (no longer than 9,000 words, WORD doc files) are invited for consideration on the following topics, although the list is not meant to be exhaustive:

1) Hawthorne’s humor compared to that of other nineteenth-century writers (e.g., Irving, Poe, Fanny Fern, Twain)
2) Hawthorne’s self-deprecating humor, especially of his work (in his introductions to his fiction; his notebooks; his letters)
3) Humor in his children’s stories; humorous depictions of his own children.
4) Hawthorne’s dark, macabre, or acerbic humor; Hawthorne’s Gothic humor
5) Hawthorne’s comic characters; Hawthorne’s caricatures
6) Hawthorne’s romance theory and comic excursions enacting that theory
7) Hawthorne’s philosophy of life and humor
8) Hawthorne’s injection of humor in his formulation of Puritan history
9) Hawthorne’s sketches and the humor of the everyday
10) Hawthorne’s humorous assessments of European life during his travels abroad
11) Hawthorne’s theory of writing (or his attacks on the marketplace) and humor
12) Hawthorne’s humor and its relationship to psychoanalytic, philosophical, and aesthetic theories of humor
13) Hawthorne’s humor and its relationship to nineteenth-century gender roles
14) Parodies and uses of Hawthorne and his works in comic strips, cartoons, and graphic narratives and how they reflect on his reputation as a great American author

Deadline for submission of completed papers is Nov. 15, 2012. Deadline for final revised submissions (of accepted essays) is April 30, 2013. Queries are welcome. Send essays to the guest editor, Prof. M. Thomas Inge at tinge@rmc.edu and to Prof. Monika Elbert, Editor of the Nathaniel Hawthorne Review, atelbertm@mail.montclair.edu

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MARK TWAIN’S HANNIBAL: The Clemens Conference

August 11-13, 2011

The Mark Twain Museum in Hannibal, Missouri, announces its first Mark Twain Conference to be held in Hannibal August 11-13.

Details and a registration form are on the Museum’s web site at

http://www.marktwainmuseum.org/index.php/conference

Make plans now to attend this inspiring and educational three days experience in Hannibal, Missouri – inspiration for The Adventures of Tom Sawyer and many other episodes in Mark Twain’s writings.

Henry Sweets, Curator

Mark Twain Boyhood Home & Museum

573-221-9010 extension 405

henry.sweets@marktwainmuseum.org

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Who's Laughing Now:

Introduction: Call for Papers

Humor is just another defense against the universe. 
(Mel Brooks)

New York

Taking up Mel Brook’s view of humor, this year’s students and graduate conference will regard humor as a discursive strategy which can be used to communicate, reify, transgress, and negotiate political, cultural, and social differences. The focus of this conference will be on U.S. American traditions and forms of humor that can be found in media as diverse as literature, film, television, radio, newspapers, and the Web.

Given the omnipresence of comedy shows, sitcoms or political satires as well as the popularity of comedy as a literary and filmic genre, we hope to attract a variety of original contributions to humor in its multiple manifestations.

Humor can be used to exert power over others by turning them into laughingstocks, making them appear ridiculous, and thereby silencing them. In contrast, humor can also be a potent strategy to expose power, to question and subvert it. Humor can be a brutal weapon that masks its violence under the guise of ‘just being funny,’ but it can also destabilize existing power relations and hierarchies.

In this conference, we hope to explore how, why, and to what effect humor is employed in U.S. American culture. What is humor? Why are certain things funny while others are not? What can humor accomplish and what are its limits? Who is supposed to laugh about whom? Who is not laughing? Who has the last laugh?

In the light of these questions, possible topics may encompass but are not limited to:

  • genres and traditions of humor in U.S. American culture
  • politically correct!? – the politics of humor, humor and politics
  • limits and transgressions of humor
  • http://www.humor.com – humor on the web and in other media
  • humor and irony after 9/11
  • theories of humor.

We would like to invite M.A. and PhD students, as well as professionals in the field to present 15-minute papers and engage in lively discussions.

Please submit your abstracts via email until August 31, 2011.

see also:
call for papers / flyer download

====================

Hi Folks,

I am seeking to round out a collection of academic essays on Tim Burton for Palgrave by adding two essays: the first on Burton and comedy (at least in part discussing Pee-wee) and the second on Tim Burton’s art with attention to the recent exhibit of his work that started at MOMA.

Essays of roughly 6000 – 7000 works will be due April 1st, 2012.

Please drop me a line at <Jeffrey.Weinstock@cmich.edu> if you are interested in participating.

Sincerely,

Jeffrey

Jeffrey Andrew Weinstock, Ph.D.
Professor of  English & Graduate Program Coordinator
Central Michigan University
Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859-0001
<Jeffrey.Weinstock@cmich.edu>; (989) 774-3101
<http://cmich.edu/chsbs/x23543.xml>

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AHSA at the Modern Language Association
Seattle, WA January 5-8, 2012

Satire’s Double-Edged Irony

The American Humor Studies Association is seeking papers that explore the often ambiguous nature of satire’s object, the lines that blur between satire and celebration, and the difficulty of predicting or controlling audience response.

Recent studies, such as “The Irony of Satire,” suggest that perception of satire’s object often rests in the reader’s or viewer’s own biases. This panel is interested in exploring the implications of this ambiguity in the production, deployment, and teaching of satire. How does this affect satire’s admittedly subversive purpose? Is this satire’s power, its limitation, or both?

250-word abstract by 15 March 2011 to Sharon D. McCoy at sdmccoy@uga.edu

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AHSA at the Rocky Mountain MLA
Scottsdale, AZ October 6-8, 2011

Abstracts are being solicited for a panel on American Humor for the Rocky Mountain Modern Language Assn. meeting in Scottsdale, AZ, October 6-8, 2011. Any area of American humor studies is welcome, including teaching American humor in the college classroom. Please submit any questions or your abstractsby March 1 to Dr. Judy Sneller, SD School of Mines & Technology at jsneller@sdsmt.edu. Applicants will be advised within 3 weeks of acceptance status. Additional information can be found at the RMMLA website: http://rmmla.wsu.edu/call/.

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AHSA Call for Papers
American Literature Association Conference
Boston, MA May 26-29, 2011

Session 1: Exploring distinctions between wit and humor. Admittedly some of the distinctions between and definitions of humor and wit are often less than helpful. AHSA invites papers that look at “historical” definitions, attempt to create and sustain new distinctions, or demonstrate shifts in how humor scholars think about and negotiate humor and wit. Email abstracts (250 words) to Bruce Michelson by1/10/2011.

Session 2: Humoring Genre. From classic films such as Mel Brooks’ Blazing Saddles and Young Frankenstein to more modern examples like Scream and Scary Movie, humor has been used as commentary on various genres. AHSA invites papers concerning film, literature, or other media that use pastiche to comment on genre conventions. Abstracts of 250 words should be sent to Jan McIntire-Strasburg by January 10, 2011.