Announcements

If you have a CFP you would like to publicize, please email Tracy Wuster at wustert@gmail.com or post in a comment to this page.

****

Dear ALA Societies Contact,

 

Please accept this short message to call your attention to an American Literature Fulbright grant at the University of Bergen in Norway. This grant provides an opportunity to explore American literature and culture in a foreign country where English language proficiency is not an issue, and to experience a different system of higher education. As program alumni will readily attest, time spent in Bergen is worthwhile and the benefits long-lasting.

 

Cassandra Falke, who is wrapping up her stay recently sent in a piece for our website reflecting on the year. In it she talks about the experience, noting succinctly,”…I have flourished here, and my work has benefitted from that.” Among other things, she mentions appreciating the combination of a light (by American standards) teaching load and little committee work with full participation in departmental decisions related to her courses.

 

The scholar normally teaches eight hours per week in the fall and two hours per week in the spring, which allows considerable time for independent research. Detailed information about this grant and the online application can be found here. The application deadline for the 2015-16 academic year is August 1st.

 

I hope you will give the possibility of applying to become a Fulbright scholar in American Literature some consideration. Please do not hesitate to contact me with any questions.

 

Sincerely,

 

Rena Levin

Program Officer

US-Norway Fulbright Foundation

*****

MLA 2015–AHSA Deadline extended!

Session 1:

Session type: Allied Organization
Organization: American Humor Studies Association
Title of session: Comic Dimensions and Varieties of Risk
Submission requirements: 250-word abstracts
Deadline for submissions: 10 March 2014
Description: Papers on thematic complexity and varieties of risk in American texts in which humor, wit and comic perspectives conjoin with other moods and intentions.

MLA 2015:  Vancouver, Canada, January 8-11, 2015

SESSION 2

Joint Session of Mark Twain Circle and American Humor Studies Association

Over the past two centuries, book-length autobiography has been commonly regarded as a high-serious project: a culminating apologia, a settling of accounts, a view from heights of maturity or old age.  Within the genre, however, there are important exceptions: works distinguished by outbreaks of humor, pervasive wit, the reconstruction of the life experience as inherently comic.   With the new Mark Twain Autobiographycommanding so much attention, we invite proposals that study ambitious autobiographical texts in which humor, wit, and laughter play a major role, and that speculate on the thematic importance of these qualities. Please send 1-2 pp. proposals for 20-page papers to John Bird,birdj@winthrop.edu, by March 10, 2014.

Please note: at the time of acceptance, potential presenters must be or become members of MLA.

MARK TWAIN CIRCLE CFP

Mark Twain Circle Main Session:  Vulnerable Twain 

Examinations of vulnerability in Mark Twain:  characters, themes, biography, autobiography, other.  Please send 1-2 pp. proposals for 20-page papers to John Bird, birdj@winthrop.edu, by March 10, 2014.

*****************************************************

Humor in Hawthorne

The Fall issue of the Nathaniel Hawthorne Review  (Vol. 39, No. 2) is a special issue devoted to the subject of “Humor in Hawthorne.”   The Guest Editor,  M. Thomas Inge of Randolph-Macon College, has noted, “Scholars are generally dubious of the idea that there is such a thing as humor in Hawthorne, but those who read his gloomy Puritanic  fiction with a careful eye will detect beneath the surface the strong presence of irony and a satiric sensibility.”  The 210-page issue offers essays by James E. Caron, Joel Conway, Steven Petersheim, Ed Piacentino, Mimosa Stephenson, and Derek Parker Royal.  Also included, and featured on the cover, is a parody of The Scarlet Letter  by John Sikoryak in the style of the Little Lulu comic books by John Stanley.  This may be the first time a critical literary journal has published a complete comic book story in its pages.   Individual copies may be purchased for $15.00 from the Nathaniel Hawthorne Society Treasurer, Leland S. Person, Department of English, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221-0069.   Membership in the Society for $25 annually includes a subscription to the Review.

*****

Soliciting proposals for a humor panel at 2014 National Women’s Studies Assoc. ConferenceI am seeking additional panelists and a moderator for a proposed panel at the 2014 NWSA national conference in Puerto Rico (Nov 13-16, 2014). The panel will be centered on women and humor in the 20th century, and specifically humor as a means of seeking justice or imagining futures (“Justice” is a sub-theme of this year’s theme of “Feminist Transgressions.” Read more about this year’s conference theme herehttp://www.nwsa.org/content.asp?pl=15&sl=27&contentid=27).

Please send responses—paper abstracts (max 100 words), or interest in moderating— by Friday, February 14, to kgr13@gwmail.gwu.edu.

****

Here is the CFP for AHSA – SAMLA – Atlanta, GA Nov  7 – 9, 2014.

19th and 20th century authors use of humor on environmental/sustainability =
issues.

The American Humor Studies Association seeks papers for a panel, which is f=
ocusing on 19th and 20th century authors and their use of humor on environm=
ental/sustainability issues. The panel takes place for the 2014 South Atlan=
tic Modern Language Association (SAMLA) Conference at the Marriott Atlanta,=
GA from November 7-9, 2014. This panel will examine how humor and sustaina=
bility can work together through various authors, such as, Caroline Kirklan=
d, Mark Twain (Roughing It/Life on the Mississippi), Edward Abbey, Dr. Seus=
s, Carl Hiassen, Diane Ackerman, Bill Bryson the definitely unsustainable h=
unting trips of tall tale folks like Davy Crockett, showing how they use hu=
mor for either pro or con sustainability in their works.=20
=09
The session invites academic papers, multi-media, or digital pieces on any =
aspect 20th century authors and their use of humor on environmental/sustain=
ability issues, by May 1, 2014, email or regular mail 300-word abstracts wi=
th the requisite information as noted in the SAMLA call for papers guidelin=
es, http://samla.memberclicks.net/participants

Please send inquiries and proposals to Mrs. Jules A. Hojnowski, at JAH11@co=
rnell.edu or 1690 Trumansburg Rd, Ithaca, NY 14850

********

Dear humor caucus colleagues:

I am writing to solicit proposals for papers or panels for the ASA annual meeting. Since the conference theme is “The Fun and the Fury,” it seems like scholars of humor might well have something valuable to contribute!

I urge you to read the description of the theme carefully, and frame your proposal to pick up some of the specific suggestions that the program committee has offered. If you send proposals for papers to me, I will work with our convener, Jennifer Hughes, to try to assemble them into coherent  panels. Please send proposals to me by 5:00 p.m on Monday, January 20th, so that we have time to get back to you before the final ASA deadline of January 26th. My email address is mtmcfadd@colby.edu.

I hope to propose a paper that offers an analysis of the feminist dimensions of Gilda Radner’s solo performance film “Gilda Live” (1980), and would welcome proposals that might connect with that, either thematically or chronologically. But all topics are welcome, and we will do our best to put them together.

Best wishes,
Margaret McFadden
American Studies Program
Colby College

***

American Humor Studies Association

Mark Twain Circle of America

Quadrennial Conference 2014

December 4-7, 2014

Four Points Sheraton French Quarter

 

The American Humor Studies Association, in conjunction with the Mark Twain Circle of America, sends out this general call for papers on American humor and Mark Twain.  The topics below are suggestions for topics that we think will be of interest; other topics are welcome, and we welcome especially submissions of sessions of three papers or roundtables.  The topics are broad in the hope that scholars will be able to find one that fits their current research.  Submissions should be sent to Jan McIntire-Strasburg via email (mcintire@slu.edu).  Please send your submissions by May 15, 2014.

Those sending in submissions for the Mark Twain Circle of America can email their proposals to Ann Ryan at ryanam@lemoyne.edu.

Early American Humor and its European Roots

Nineteenth Century Humor—from Southwest to Northeast to Far West

20th Century Humor and the American Novel

Regional and/or transnational humor

New Media Approaches to Humor

Humor in film, television, comics, and other visual media

Humor and Theatre

Stand-Up Comedy

Online humor

Humor and Ethnicity

Humor and Gender

Humor and Class

Humor and Sexuality

Humor and War

Contemporary Approaches to Irony, Satire, Wit, and other topics

Teaching Humor

New Directions in American Humor Studies

*************

DEADLINE EXTENDED to 1/3–

Jack Rosenbalm Prize for American Humor

*****

MLA 2015

Session 1:

Session type: Allied Organization
Organization: American Humor Studies Association
Title of session: Comic Dimensions and Varieties of Risk
Submission requirements: 250-word abstracts
Deadline for submissions: 5 March 2014
Description: Papers on thematic complexity and varieties of risk in American texts in which humor, wit and comic perspectives conjoin with other moods and intentions.

MLA 2015:  Vancouver, Canada, January 8-11, 2015

SESSION 2

Joint Session of Mark Twain Circle and American Humor Studies Association

Over the past two centuries, book-length autobiography has been commonly regarded as a high-serious project: a culminating apologia, a settling of accounts, a view from heights of maturity or old age.  Within the genre, however, there are important exceptions: works distinguished by outbreaks of humor, pervasive wit, the reconstruction of the life experience as inherently comic.   With the new Mark Twain Autobiography commanding so much attention, we invite proposals that study ambitious autobiographical texts in which humor, wit, and laughter play a major role, and that speculate on the thematic importance of these qualities. Please send 1-2 pp. proposals for 20-page papers to John Bird, birdj@winthrop.edu, by March 10, 2014.

Please note: at the time of acceptance, potential presenters must be or become members of MLA.

MARK TWAIN CIRCLE CFP

Mark Twain Circle Main Session:  Vulnerable Twain 

Examinations of vulnerability in Mark Twain:  characters, themes, biography, autobiography, other.  Please send 1-2 pp. proposals for 20-page papers to John Bird, birdj@winthrop.edu, by March 10, 2014.

******

 

Special issue of Studies in American Humor, Fall 2015

American Humor in the 1920s and 1930s: Cross-Media Perspectives

 

CALL FOR PAPERS

Studies in American Humor, the journal of the American Humor Studies Association, invites submission of scholarly papers on humor across media in the 1920s and 1930s for a special issue of the journal appearing in the fall of 2015, coedited by Rob King (Columbia University) and Judith Yaross Lee (Ohio University).  Specifically, we are interested in papers that explore the circulation of humor within and across media industries during this formative period in the consolidation of American mass culture.

Recent research on early twentieth-century mass culture has challenged medium-specific histories of entertainment industries by examining the growing integration of print, radio, film, and music publishing during the 1920s. What has not been researched, however, is the role that humor played within this changing media landscape. What function, for instance, did humor play in greasing the wheels of an increasingly convergent entertainment industry? How were discrete forms of comic expression remediated by comic performers and humorists who adapted their talents to different media forms?

Topics might include, but are not limited to:

  • stage comedians’ transition to movies, especially following the advent of sound film (e.g., the Marx Brothers, the Three Stooges, Mantan Moreland, Moran and Mack);
  • comparisons between comic writers’ contributions to periodicals such as The New Yorker and their work in other media (e.g., Ben Hecht, Donald Ogden Stewart, or Dorothy Parker in Hollywood);
  • relations between cartoon and comic verbal contents of print media;
  • comic celebrity or stardom across media (e.g., Robert Benchley, Anita Loos, Will Rogers);
  • racial or ethnic humor or caricature across media (e.g., cross-media representations or themes, works across media by individual humorists);
  • radio’s emergence as a mass medium  (e.g., adaptations of print and stage traditions to radio shows like Lum and Abner).

Potential contributors should send queries and abstracts (500-750 words) to studiesinamericanhumor@ohio.edu by June 1, 2014.  Final manuscripts will be due March 1, 2015.  General information on Studies in American Humor and submission guidelines are available at http://studiesinamericanhumor.org.

*********

American Literature Association

May 22-25, 2014

Washington, D.C.

American Humor Studies Association

Call for Papers

The AHSA plans to sponsor three sessions at the 2014 national meeting. We seek cogent, provocative, well-researched papers on the following subjects:

1. “Political Humor from Franklin to Colbert”—Abstracts (300 words max.) are encouraged on the connections between political discourse and American humor.  All periods and approaches—from literary texts to stand-up comedy—will be considered.  Papers should address both a specific context and the more general context of the uses and limits of humor in political realms.

2. “Teaching American Humor”–Abstracts (300 words max.) are encouraged for a roundtable on the challenges and joys of teaching American humor.  Each presenter will have 8-12 minutes (depending on the number of presenters chosen) to present their theoretical and/or practical approach to the teaching of American humor—whether focused on the general subject or on a specific topic.  A decent amount of time will be given to discussion of the topic.

3. “Graphic Humor in American Periodicals”—Abstracts (300 words max.) are encouraged on subjects addressing “graphic humor” in American periodicals.  Subjects could range from cartoon strips to political cartoons to illustrations, and may include alternative interpretations of the term “graphic.”  Papers should focus on the periodical context of the subject, as well as broader concerns of interpreting humor.  Panel sponsored by the American Humor Studies Association and the Research Society for American Periodicals.

Please e-mail abstracts no later than January 10, 2014 to Tracy Wuster (wustert@gmail.com) with the subject line: “AHSA session, 2013 ALA.” Notifications will go out no later than January 20, 2013.

**************************************************************************

American Literature Association

May 22-25, 2014

Washington, D.C.

Research Society for American Periodicals

Call for Papers

RSAP seeks proposals for the American Literature Association’s 25th Annual Conference, 22-25 May 2014 at the Hyatt Regency Washington on Capitol Hill, in Washington, D.C. Proposals are requested for the following:

1. War and/in American Periodicals after 1914

As spaces of dialogue and dissent, American periodicals have played a formative role in the negotiation of war’s meaning in American culture. This panel seeks 15-20–minute papers that might address any aspect of this topic, including but not limited to: seriality and war; soldier newspapers; trench journalism; periodicals and the home front; fictional representations of war in periodicals; periodicals as spaces for dialogue and dissent about war; anti-war publications; responses to war in black periodicals; war in visual culture; the imagined communities of wartime America; literary style and war correspondence; etc. Please email 300-word abstract and C.V. to Amanda Gailey at gailey@unl.edu by December 15, 2013; please put “RSAP panel submission” in the subject line.

2. “Graphic Humor in American Periodicals”—Abstracts (300 words max.) are encouraged on subjects addressing “graphic humor” in American periodicals.  Subjects could range from cartoon strips to political cartoons to illustrations, and may include alternative interpretations of the term “graphic.”  Papers should focus on the periodical context of the subject, as well as broader concerns of interpreting humor. This panel is co-sponsored by the American Humor Studies Association and the Research Society for American Periodicals. Please e-mail abstracts no later than January 10, 2013 to Tracy Wuster (wustert@gmail.com) with the subject line: “AHSA/RSAP session, 2013 ALA.”

Notifications will go out no later than January 20, 2013.

****

CALL FOR PAPERS:

THE RED LION SYMPOSIUM ON HUMOR PUBLICATION

(A Joint Project of the Mark Twain Circle and the American Humor Studies Association)

Where:    The Red Lion Inn, Stockbridge, Massachusetts (http://www.redlioninn.com/)

When:     Thursday-Saturday February 20-22

Purpose: This working conference is intended to advance publication of work on American Humor, Mark Twain, and related work in progress. Individuals papers and group symposiums will be offered relating to work in progress which will be presented by participants and discussed and developed with the help of attending scholars.

Thursday Evening:  Welcome Address: Publication, by David E. E. Sloane and Others TBA

Friday: Morning Symposium and presentations and feedback; Afternoon symposium and feedback

Saturday:  Morning Symposium; Afternoon, events

Registration: $45.00

Rooms–reserved block of rooms to be reserved by individuals in advance at conference rate of $109 Thursday and $179 Friday and Saturday (plus tax).

Other events to be arranged. Red Lion Inn is one of the grand old Inns of New England, featuring gourmet dining, luxury rooms, heated indoor-outdoor swimming year-round, and other amenities. Stockbridge is the home of the Norman Rockwell Museum and is easily reached from Bradley International Airport in Hartford/Springfield.

You are welcome to REGISTER with or without giving a presentation simply be sending your $45 registration fee and the form below to David E. E. Sloane, English Dept. University of New Haven 300 Boston Post Rd. West Haven CT 06516. To PARTICIPATE as a Speaker, Chair, or Respondent, please send a paragraph outlining your objective/project or experience on a separate page with your reservation fee and contact information.  Questions should be addressed to: DSloane@newhaven.edu

NAME________________________________________

ADDRESS_____________________________________

________________________________________

ACADEMIC AFFILIATION_______________________

STATUS ___Guest ___Presenter ___Chair _____Respondent

Proposal:

****************************************************************


*****

View the preliminary 2014 Conference Schedule, and check back soon for information on Speakers, Exhibitor Opportunities, and more!

Are you tired of the same kind of conference? Tired of sitting through boring sessions waiting for the day to end so you can have fun? Do you want to attend a conference where laughing AND learning are the rule and NOT the exception?

Then you won’t want to miss the 27th Annual AATH Humor Conference in Vincennes, Indiana… April 3-6, 2014… at the Red Skelton Museum of American Comedy located on the campus of Vincennes University.

Join in on the informative fun as AATH (the Association for Applied & Therapeutic Humor) meets for its 27th annual, international gathering. Our appropriate conference site will be the brand new “Red Skelton Museum of American Comedy” located on the campus of Vincennes University in Vincennes Indiana. Come to learn, to share “best practices,” to network, to laugh, to see old friends, to meet new ones, and to be genuinely uplifted by the experience! Keynotes, Workshops, Humor Academy, Research Poster Session, CEUs, Scholarships, and a New Curriculum Track Especially for Therapeutic Clowning!

*****

Mark Twain and Money: Call for contributions to a volume of new scholarly
essays

Questions about Mark Twain’s fascination with wealth have played a major
role in Twain criticism from the very beginning.  It might be argued, in
fact, that the foundational disagreement in Twain studies hinges on whether
his commercial inclinations fostered his artistic achievement (Bernard
DeVoto) or bastardized his talent (Van Wyck Brooks).  Rather than prolong
the biographical debate, this volume of original essays will draw on recent
work at the intersection of economic theory and literary studies (sometimes
referred to as the New Economic Criticism) to reevaluate and deepen our
understanding of Mark Twain’s complicated relationship with money and issues
of economy, broadly understood.  Topics of interest might include Twain’s
engagement with:

the profession of authorship

the literary marketplace

concepts of ownership

concepts of intellectual property, real property, and personhood

copyright law and theory

the nature of money and its relationship to art, literature, and
representation

debates about the gold and silver standards

the meaning and significance of debt, credit, and usury

commodities and the commodity form

production and consumption

economic panic and bankruptcy

Webster & Co.

investment and speculation

gender and/or masculinity in relation to economic forces and events

capitalism and capitalists

progressive politics, socialism, and the rights of workers

gift theory

the advertising industry

branding and marketing

the role of fraud in economic transactions/the role of hoax in literary
transactions

work and leisure

play (or childhood) in relation to economic structures and practices

Please send paper abstracts of 500 words and a working title to Harry Wonham
wonham@uoregon.edu by January 1, 2014. Final essays will be between
6,000-8,000 words in length and should conform to the MLA documentation
style. Final papers will be due by September 1, 2014.  Questions, comments,
and suggestions should be directed to Harry Wonham, Department of English,
University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403 ( wonham@uoregon.edu ).

****

Dear Colleagues -We are now accepting chapter submissions for a proposed book collection of critical essays examining stand-up comedy as rhetoric, tentatively titled Standing Up, Speaking Up: Stand-Up Comedy and the Rhetoric of Social Change. A brief abstract of the project follows this e-mail.If you are interested in contributing to the collection, please submit
an initial manuscript of your work to crschmitt@wisc.edu by Friday,
April 25th.
Manuscripts will be reviewed by the editors and final inclusion of all
submissions will be contingent on the individual manuscripts’ execution,
scholarly rigor, and adherence to the collection’s primary themes.Contributors may consider the words and routines of, for instance,
George Carlin, Richard Pryor, Dick Gregory, Roseanne Barr, Louis C.K.,
Margaret Cho, Dave Chapelle, or Sarah Silverman, though other
suggestions are certainly welcomed! A full list of suggested topics and
themes appears below.PLEASE NOTE, THIS COLLECTION WILL NOT FEATURE ESSAYS ON:
– humor as a general concept or humor theory (except when humor theory
is uniquely applicable)
– the dissection of jokes or judgments about the “funniness” of routines
– the history of stand-up comedy
– biography
– analysis of non-stand-up comedians
– television or film comedy
– comedians performing outside of comedic rolesWe are at the moment most seeking pieces of rhetorical criticism of
specific speech texts in the hopes that the collection as a whole will
highlight the special rhetorical strategies employed by comic speakers
in comic frames that are otherwise inaccessible to most other speakers
in most other situations.If you are interested, or if you have questions, please contact us via
e-mail at crschmitt@wisc.edu.Thanks again,
Casey R. Schmitt
Dept. of Communication Arts
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Matthew R. Meier
School of Media and Communication
Bowling Green State University

PROJECT DESCRIPTION:
Molded in the tradition of the Ciceronian speech to entertain, stand-up
comedy that features a lone rhetor delivering monologues before an
audience is arguably the most traditional form of public address found
on our contemporary comedy landscape. Moreover, stand-up comedy in the
United States has been uniquely influential in its ability to speak
truth and power, to utter the unutterable, and to publicly consider the
world not as it is but as it should be. In recent decades, some of the
most celebrated, circulated, poignant, and culturally influential
American oratorical performances have come not from leaders or
activists, lawyers or religious visionaries, but from particularly
gifted jesters and fools.

This collection turns a concerted critical eye to the unique rhetorical
artistry of the modern stand-up comedian as a force for social change.
It asks: in what ways is stand-up comedy connected to the issues of
cultural transformation? What impact has stand-up comedy had on American
society and what forms has that impact taken? How has stand-up
manifested as commentary on the politics of race, gender, and the
American dream? In short, how does stand-up comedy facilitate social
change for the publics it addresses?

Other scholars have begun to address these comic conundrums. For
example, Kenneth Burke submits the comic corrective and comic frame as
necessary resources for understanding, critiquing, and changing public
culture.1 Burke’s concepts, with the addition of his construction of the
perspective by incongruity,2 have been fruitful tools for a number of
writers and researchers addressing comic texts.3 Additionally, in his
essay on parody and public culture, Robert Hariman argues that the comic
antagonism of parody both creates and sustains our public culture
through means that are inaccessible via the otherwise serious rhetoric
of officialdom.4 In a rare essay addressing stand-up comedy directly,
Joanne Gilbert-a former stand-up comedian herself-contends that by
performing self and culture the stand-up comedian exercises a special
capacity to offer critique sanctioned as entertainment that can uniquely
engage hegemonic stereotypes and objectifications due to its comedic
context.5 However, while this literature contributes to an overarching
discussion of comedy, it only begins to address the connection between
stand-up comedy performance specifically and actual social change.

In turning a focus toward this connection, then, the essays in this
collection will offer analyses of important moments in the tradition of
American stand-up comedy from comedians who have been especially
involved in shaping that tradition. We invite submissions featuring
rhetorical criticism of specific speech texts in order to highlight the
special rhetorical strategies employed by comic speakers in comic frames
that are otherwise inaccessible to non-comic rhetors in other speaking
situations. Together, these essays will demonstrate that comedy is
inextricably connected to the issues of social and cultural
transformation as an important voice amidst the cacophony of traditional
political oratory, and that the stand-up comic rhetor, through ludic
play and brazen confrontation of incongruities, can uniquely question,
challenge, and re-shape social conventions while still managing to get a
laugh or two along the way.

 ***************************************************************************************************************

STANDING CALLS FOR PAPERS:

Call for Papers: Studies in American Humor

 

Studies in American Humor (StAH) invites submissions for upcoming issues.  Submissions of essay manuscripts of between 5000 and 8000 words are welcome on any topic, theme, practice, practitioner, and medium of American humor.  StAH values new transnational and interdisciplinary approaches as well as traditional critical and historical humanities scholarship.

The official journal of the American Humor Studies Association, Studies in American Humor (ISSN 0095-280X) has published scholarly essays, review essays, and book reviews on all aspects of American humor since 1974.  Issues appear semi-annually in spring and fall; articles are indexed in the MLA International Bibliography and available in full text in EBSCOhost’s Humanities International Complete and Literary Reference Center databases.

Additional information can be found at studiesinamericanhumor.org.  Please address essay submissions and inquiries to Judith Yaross Lee, Editor of Studies in American Humor, at studiesinamericanhumor@ohio.edu.

Please address books for review and interest in serving as a reviewer to

Tracy Wuster, Book Review Editor, at wustert@gmail.com

***

Humor: The International Journal of Humor Research

Instructions for Authors

Contributors are invited to submit articles pertaining to humor research to the editor

Editor-in-chief
Giselinde Kuipers
Department of Sociology and Anthropology
University of Amsterdam
OZ Achterburgwal 185
1012DK Amsterdam
The Netherlands
email: humorjournal@gmail.com

See website for more information.

***

Comedy Studies

Comedy plays a more important role today than ever before: it is a multi-billion dollar global industry, with Hollywood comedies taking major profits each year and comedians commanding huge salaries and audiences worldwide. Yet there is currently no academic journal dedicated to these cultural phenomena.

Comedy Studies is a response to this glaring absence. The journal will cover multiple aspects of comedy, with articles about both contemporary and historical comedy, interviews with practicing comedians and writers, reviews, letters and editorials. The journal seeks to be instrumental in creating interdisciplinary discourse about the nature and practice of comedy and provide a forum for the disparate voices of comedians, academics and writers. In this way, the journal aims to be the first step in the creation of a community committed to the promotion, documentation and expansion of the field of comedy studies.

Sample themes might include Ancient Greek theatre, the relation of comedy and food and comedy and gender. Another interest would be the role of comedy in therapy; in medical circles comedy is being incorporated into the healing process and professionals are beginning to develop methods of using laughter to deal with physical and psychological problems. The journal is also intent on investigating historical attempts to analyse comedy, from Aristotle to Freud. Finally, it aims to create links between the growing number of university departments who offer specialist units or courses in comedy in the UK and abroad.

Comedy Studies invites contributions from researchers and practitioners throughout the world seeking to analyse all aspects of comedy, laughter and joking. Some proposed topics are:

•    Contemporary performance aspects in comedy
•    Comedy and gender 
•    Comedy and therapy
•    The comedy foreigner
•    Comedy in political life

***

See this page for expired announcements.

Copyright © 2000-2011 American Humor Studies Association


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